Lettuce, 'Eruption'


(Lactuca sativa) A true mini volcano of a lettuce, Eruption displays Dark red tips over light green buttery-crunchy-romaine leaves, all wrapped around a pink magma core. Small “Latin” style heads, slightly larger than Little Gems, with an upright stature. This lettuce has been found to be resistant to multiple strains of Sclerotinia (Lettuce Drop), and Verticillium Wilt, in experiments by the USDA in California, and has been used to breed that resistance into Latin and Romaine lettuces. The pink core makes a stunning cross-section, perfect for a gem-type salad, and the flavor is that of a crunchy, sweet Romaine. A relatively recent Enza Zaden variety dropped into the USDA Germplasm Repository and plucked out by us in a scan of interesting sounding lettuces. Slow to bolt. *Word needs to get out about this variety! One of our absolute favorites and deserving of your attention.
28 (baby leaf) -50 days. UO

Packet: 1g (~800 seeds)

Product Code: LET-ER-pkt

Availability:In stock

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$3.85

$9.00

$27.00

Growing Info

SOWING:

Sow indoors 4 weeks before your last frost.

Transplant out 3-4 week old plants.

Direct seed after last frost.

Sow every 3 weeks for constant lettuce.

Note: Seeds will become dormant if exposed to high temperatures. Lettuce grows best in cooler weather.

PLANTING DEPTH:

1/8-1/4"

SPACING:

8-10" in rows 15" apart.

EMERGENCE:

2-10 days @ soil temp 68F and lower.

LIGHT:

Full sun to part shade

FERTILITY:

Medium. Prefers well-drained, and evenly moist soil and is sensitive to low pH.

ADDITIONAL NOTES:

Uneven watering can result in tip burn, the browning of the leaf margins, which is the result of an inability of the plant to move calcium to the growing edge fast enough to meet its growth needs. Consistent, evenly moist soil or calcium amendments can be beneficial if this seems to be a problem.

Hot weather can cause premature bolting. Generally, when the plants begin to stretch upwards (to flower), the leaves become bitter and the eating quality poor.