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Corn

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  1. amish butter

    Amish Butter

    *Heirloom*
    Long ago I can distinctly remember craving Amish Butter with all the zest of the description….Creamy! Buttery! Needs no salt or oil! I am happy to report that it only gets better. Amish delivers on the popcorn front with large, fluffy white popcorn and opens up a world of versatility in one variety. Ground coarsely or made into masa (hominy) and flour it can then be used for polenta, tamales, grits, breads, cookies...it is that good. Our friends at Ayers Creek Farm in Oregon have been happily sharing it with market customers and restaurants for just these purposes and to great acclaim. 8’ plants selected for 6” conical heads with both rice and pearl type kernels.  It’s nice when such delight can be had and shared starting from a small handful of seed. Pre–1885 white kernelled seed maintained by the PA Dutch and brought into the market in 1988 by Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.
    100 days. AC

    Packet: 1/2oz (~100 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  2. dakota black

    Dakota Black

    We are not ashamed to say, in the height of the busy growing season, after a long days work, with no motivation left to cook, we have served up our fair share of popcorn family dinners. (You thought we had anything left at the end of the day to actually cook any of those veggies we so lovingly nurtured for market?).  Fact is, we eat a LOT of popcorn around here, and I am so glad we have found a cultivar that we can reliably mature in NW Washington. A product of the Podoll family’s inspiring farm-based breeding program at Prairie Road Organics in Fullerton, ND, Dakota Black produces show stopping 6-7” glossy garnet-black ears on sturdy plants. Kernels pop up pure white. The Podolls have been working at Prairie Road to select for a rounder kernel shape which they consider to produce a superior popcorn, and our stock comes from their latest selection. This is one of the varieties we hold most dear for home use. And, we promise, this seed Grows and Matures in N.WA! 
    95-100 days. WG

    Packet: 1/2oz (~90 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  3. Floriani Red Flint

    Floriani Red Flint

    Known as "spinna rossa della Valsugana" in its native alpine home, the Sugana Valley in the Northern Italian province of Trentino, Floriani is an old land-race variety selected by the local farmers for many generations for one purpose: polenta. Like grits to the american south, polenta is at the center of the hearty rustic gastronomy of these southern foothills of the Alps, coarsely ground and slow cooked to creamy perfection. It's flavor is exceptional, and while polenta is its traditional preparation, it is equally at home ground for corncakes and breads. We at Uprising have a soft spot for the Italian staple though and there are few dishes craved more than polenta ai funghi de bosco, soft polenta topped with porcini mushrooms. If you like, grate in some sharp alpine cheese like pecorino, lightly braise something from the chicory family, open a bottle of Nebbiolo and spend a couple hours with friends.
    90-100 days. CV

    Packet: 1oz (80 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  4. mandan red clay

    Mandan Red Clay

    (Parching) aka Lavender Mandan Parching. This strikingly beautiful and delicious flour/parching corn is said to come from the Mandan Tribe of North Dakota. Short (4’), stout and bushy plants with multiple tillers (secondary stalks) provide early yields of lavender colored ears. Parching corn is a soft kernelled type that puffs slightly when heated in a dry skillet, and makes a great snack eaten out of hand. It also grinds down to a beautiful pink cornmeal, used often in our house for pancakes, muffins, and cornbread. One of the more beautiful corns we’ve come across and wonderfully adapted to PNW growing conditions.
    80-90 days. DW

    Packet: 1oz (~80 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  5. painted mountain

    Painted Mountain

    The life work of Montana breeder Dave Christiansen, Painted Mountain is one of the great farm-bred successes of our time. In a time when seed companies were breeding corn for warm, humid mid-west and east coast climates, Christiansen set out to develop a more rugged, early maturing mountain corn to grow in Montana conditions. Starting from an initial cross of close to 70 native dry corns (some now extinct), the variety has been selected upon for nearly 40 years and pushed to the limit of what corn can withstand. His efforts gained the attention of North Korean agricultural ministers who brought him, along with 3 tons of seed, to Korea to work with agronomists and growers to potentially aid their country’s food crisis. It has been grown successfully from Siberia to South Africa. Plants are compact at 5’ and produce long slender ears (6-8”) with just an unbelievable spectrum of colors. If you can’t mature it you should rethink growing dry corn where you live. Great for cornmeal and we love it for making posole. Resilient, diverse, and adaptable, this is Mad Max corn...the one that will survive the coming climate crisis.
    85 days. WG

    Packet: 1oz (~100 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  6. roys calais flint

    Roy's Calais Flint

    *Ark of Taste Heirloom*
    One of the most beautiful and best northern adapted dry corns we have (and listen Frenchy, we pronounce it “Callous” in these parts!). A classic 8-row northern flint originating with the Abenaki tribes of northern New England and Quebec, the variety consists of 8-10” single color ears in a color mix of mostly yellow/gold &  red,  with some less common orange.  Passed on to pioneer farmers, such as Roy and Ruth Fair of Callais, VT who put their own stamp of genetic selection on the corn, it eventually found its way to seedsman Tom Stearns who brought it to the commercial marketplace. Anthony and Carol Boutard, of Ayers Creek Farm in Gaston, OR, have been stewarding our stock as an important market crop for their farm for over a decade, selecting for long slender ears, regular 8-row kernel organization, and a higher portion of the recessive red ears, as they show superior cool soil emergence and earlier ripening. Roy’s makes a flavorful cornmeal, and is great for hominy, or a toothsome posole. Historically famous, this variety, or a very closely related one, was the one corn that survived the  1816 “Year Without a Summer” in northern Vermont, a year that brought a foot of snow on June 7th and killing frosts every month of the year. So quit complaining about the weather eh?
    90 days. AC

    Packet: 1oz (~100 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  7. tuxana

    Tuxana

    I’ve always read “great old fashioned corn flavor!” in seed catalogs to mean, “not sweet, starchy,  and …well…pretty bad” (kind of like “great for cooking!” in carrot descriptions). If you are seeking super-sweet Se and Se2 style corn, there are lots of hybrids to chose from (and some exciting OPs in the pipeline). But this is a well bred and soulful sweet corn. I realized perhaps for the first time last year, that modern sweeties are really not very good for anything but fresh corn on the cob. For salsa, chowder, etc we look for a more complex, rounded, classic taste and texture. Tasters found Tuxana, fresh on the cob, to have a compelling creaminess and…well…great old fashioned corn flavor. Tall plants with large, full, white kernelled ears. Bred and being selected yearly by Jonathan Spero of Lupine Knoll Farm.
    80 days. LK

    Packet: 1oz (100 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

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