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  1. New
    Amaranth/Callaloo 'Suriname'

    Amaranth/Callaloo 'Suriname'

    (Amaranthus sp.) We’ve grown ornamental amaranths for many years, and while we’ve long known them to be nutrient dense greens (as well as beautiful blooms), we haven’t really pursued much of a culinary relationship with the plant. This variety was shared with us by fellow seedsman/breeder Jay Bost of Go Farm Hawaii as his favorite for the greens heavy Caribbean staple dish callaloo. Different greens are used in different regions, but in the southern Caribbean (Suriname, Guyana) its amaranth. This variety is originally from Suriname and Jay has grown it in for years first in Florida, and then Oahu so we naturally thought it would be a perfect fit for the PNW(!) Fortunately, Amaranth is not a picky plant (pigweed anyone?) and it grew a lush bushy forest of greens with unruly sprays of copper seedheads to 7’. Tender young greens are best and the bushy plants provideth aplenty.
    50 days, greens. UO

    Packet: 150 seeds

    Starting at: $3.50

  2. Bean, Bush Dry 'Tiger's Eye'

    Bean, Bush Dry 'Tiger's Eye'

    *Heirloom*
    Also known as Pepa de Zappalo, this heirloom comes originally from Chile and Argentina.  For those who value dry beans for their aesthetic beauty as well for their taste, tiger's eye is practically without peer. The large flat beans are mustard yellow with burgundy swirls. Worth growing for their beauty alone, the rich flavor seals the deal. Good as shelly beans, in soups, and for refried beans. Great bean to substitute for Pintos in Southwest inspired cooking.

    80-90 days. CF, UO

    Packet: 1oz (~60 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  3. New
    Bean, Bush Lima 'Jackson Wonder'

    Bean, Bush Lima 'Jackson Wonder'

    (Phaseolus lunatus) We have grown this beautiful heirloom from 1888 at our farm for two seasons now, and it is a real treat to pop open the dry pods and see the patterned seeds. Light to dark chestnut background with maroon mottling all the way up to fully maroon with chestnut speckling. A highly productive variety, this plant was putting out fresh beans all summer long, throughout the fall rains and right up until frost. Can be grown as a dry bean in our northern climate if you harvest dry pods about once a week near the end of summer, but is also an excellent producer of fresh Limas for freezing. According to William Woys Weaver, this variety is not as affected by cooler nighttime temperatures as other Lima are, making it more widely adaptable across the country. Young fresh beans are green while the more mature begin to show coloration, which will bleed out in the cook pot. Because of this, the mature Jacksons are better suited to soups and stews rather than being served on their own. When cooked as a shelly bean, it is exceptionally creamy with a classic Lima flavor. While large seeded Lima varieties originated in the Andes, the smaller varieties were domesticated in Guatemala and Mexico much later, around the year 800. Much like cowpeas, Lima plants secrete nectar from glands other than inside the flower. Known as extrafloral nectaries, these are used by the plant to attract ants, wasps and flies as a defense against herbivorous insects. 18-24” plants.
    68 days. UO

    Packet: 1/2oz (~40 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  4. Bean, Pole Dry 'Alaric (Tarbais)'

    Bean, Pole Dry 'Alaric (Tarbais)'

    In the village of Tarbais at the foot of the Pyrenees in southwest France, a cooperative of growers produce one of the most renowned white beans of Europe. The variety is called Alaric (named for a local canal), and the purpose is singular: Cassoulet. Alaric holds the unusual distinction of being a bean used to lighten the meal up! Cassoulet is truly a rich and fatty affair for the winter months, traditionally full of pork, duck fat, and sausages, slow cooked for hours, and the beans excel in this role: some softening to thicken the stock and some retaining their shape and texture in spite of their nearly non-existent skin. The name and production is protected by the French government with the Label Rouge (similar to other protected products like Champagne and Roquefort), meaning that any bean carrying the name “Tarbais” must come from the cooperative. We’re calling ours by the variety name, Alaric, Washington grown and slowly adapting from the original French stock to its new home at our farm. Vigorous vines grow to 7+’ and set wide, flat pods filled with the large, pure white beans. For a white bean, we found them fairly resilient to wet weather around harvest time.
    95-100 days. UO

    Packet: 40 seeds

    Starting at: $3.50

  5. New
    Bean, Pole Dry 'Pellegrini'

    Bean, Pole Dry 'Pellegrini'

    Angelo Pellegrini (1904-1991) is a Seattle area legend. His recipe for basil pesto written for Sunset Magazine in 1946 was likely the first pesto recipe ever published in the US. An Italian immigrant, food writer, and Professor of English at UW, he left us with a body of writing that includes “The Unprejudiced Palate”, “Wine and the Good Life”, “The Food Lovers Garden”, and “Lean Years, Happy Years”, works both nostalgic and visionary in equal parts that speak to a life and culture centered around the kitchen, the garden, and the cellar. He also left us a bean. The little grey and white Italian bean known to Angelo as “Monachine” (or little nuns), originally a gift of his winemaker friend Robert Mondavi’s uncle, could be found growing in his Seattle area garden for over a half century. Pellegrini was very, very fond of the bean, famously enjoying them one at a time with just a drizzle of olive oil. Years after his death, Angelo’s son Brent gifted the Herbfarm restaurant, an early farm-to-table pioneer, 11 seeds from which they endeavored to bring it back from the brink of being lost. The short, light green pods can be enjoyed as stringless fresh beans, but in our opinion, the variety truly shines as a shelly or dry bean with a deep flavor and creamy texture that inspire one to savor slowly. The plants are vigorous climbers and prolific producers, a bit later than many of our beans perhaps, but well equipped to endure some weather around harvest time and still make it into the pantry without much fuss.
    100-110 days. UO

    Packet: 40 seeds

    Starting at: $3.50

  6. Beet 'Touchstone Gold'

    Beet 'Touchstone Gold'

    Touchstone came on the scene several years ago and took the golden beet category by storm!  Golden beet varieties had been plagued by low germination, wonky shapes, and inconsistent performance.  Here's a new standard: lush and vigorous leaf growth, beautifully shaped round smooth roots, great mild, sweet flavor.  Nice to see such a solid breeding effort go into an OP when so much of the beet market has gone hybrid.  Golden beets are a thing of culinary beauty and make for a very classy presentation in any beet dish (and no migrating color!). Grate them, grill them, steam them, roast them…
    55-60 days. WGS, MF

    Packet: 100 seeds

     

    Starting at: $3.50

  7. Beet, '3 Beet Mix'

    Beet, '3 Beet Mix'

    Sounds like a DJ demo but is our mix of Red, Gold and Chioggia beets in equal parts. For those of you that have a hard time deciding, limited space...
    UO, WGS, MF, HW

    Packet: 100 seeds

    Starting at: $3.50

  8. New
    Belgian Endive/Witloof 'Macun'

    Belgian Endive/Witloof 'Macun'

    (C. intybus) To grow Belgian endive is to witness one of the most marvelous transformations in the world of vegetables. The plant starts in the field as a mildly charmless, bitter tasting, gangly, oversized dandelion looking thing. Its enormous rough taproot is then dug, the greens trimmed back, and then is replanted, this time in complete darkness, where over the course of about a month a second refined, elegantly curving, dense golden leaf growth (the “chicon”) emerges from the stump. They are magical creatures. We’ve grown them in closets, under staircases, in crawlspaces, corners of barns, even our seed room at the office. In the winter months, being able to cut a couple and bring them into the kitchen makes us feel rich. Macun is a good variety, bred for production in Europe, that has consistently produced the best, densest chicons for us in our not-so-professional forcing situations. Sweet, lightly bitter, golden little leafy boats to grill or fill with all sorts of deliciousness. Grow some, ok?
    UO

    Packet: .5g (~350 seeds)

    Starting at: $3.50

  9. Blood Sorrel

    Blood Sorrel

    (Rumex sanguineus) Blood sorrel, also known as bloody dock or red veined dock is a striking bright green, red veined herbaceous perennial, culinary green, and aromatic herb (12-18” tall/around) hardy all the way down to zone 4. One of the first greens to emerge in the spring and last to go come fall and ever  ready to put out tender new upright growth provided you supply encouragement by cutting it back. The taste is similar to other sorrels due to its oxalic acid content, tangy with a slightly acidic/lemony bite, and is lovely added to salads and sandwiches when young and tender or into soups, gratins, and sauces when more mature. Among the most ornamental of sorrels, you will find it to be just as happy in your flower garden. And if you ever find yourself on the verge of scurvy, this one here will supply the vit C you need! Appreciates consistent watering but is forgiving if you or the heavens forget. Though perennial in our area it is usually cultivated commercially as an annual for a continuous supply of tender baby leaves.
    40-55 days (baby leaf). UO

    Packet: 250 seeds

    Starting at: $3.50

  10. Cabbage 'Columbia (Nash's Summer Green)'

    Cabbage 'Columbia (Nash's Summer Green)'

    (B. oleracea) A market-worthy selection from Nash Huber out in Sequim WA from an old variety named “Columbia”, Nash’s Summer Green is a quick to mature, split resistant, round green cabbage showing good uniformity of medium size, dense heads. Great summer cropper to get the kraut season rolling early.
    70 days. NF

    Packet: 100 seeds

     

     

    Starting at: $3.50

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